Student Writing

One World Education believes that students should write to be read, in addition to earning a grade. We select and publish around 1% of the exemplary writing from Student Ambassadors who completed the One World Program in order to model grade-level writing and to create a forum for peer-to-peer learning. Additionally, every student-authored essay is accompanied by a Reflection Experience, which is a series of content and reading comprehension assessments.

Student Ambassador: Ellie Olsen | Ambassador Class: 2010 | Grade: 10
Ellie tells a story of injustice as well as one of the loyalty and obligation of two brothers, both Uighurs, who were detained at Guantánamo Bay. She exposes the controversy surrounding the closing of the Guantánamo Bay detention facility and the challenge of resettling inmates.
 
Student Ambassador: Chinyere Ukaegbu | Ambassador Class: 2010 | Grade: 11
Chinyere writes about her struggle with her Nigerian culture and heritage. With vivid imagery, Chinyere takes the reader on a journey through Nigeria and discoverers an appreciation for understanding world cultures.
 
Student Ambassador: Lucas Lytel | Ambassador Class: 2010 | Grade: 7
Lucas writes his Reflection about his younger brother's struggle with autism. He reveals the impact that autism has on his family and shares the reality that many people living with autism encounter daily. This account of a brother's love and support draws attention to the fastest growing developmental disability, autism.
 
Student Ambassador: Ebenezer Arhu | Ambassador Class: 2010 | Grade: 10
Ebenezer writes about traveling to Ghana, his parents' homeland. He shares with us the colonial history of this African nation and the resilience of the Ghanaian people, a history not well known to most American students. His personal introspection while discovering his roots is a powerful lesson for all, helping us to answer the lifelong question of "Who Am I?"
 
Student Ambassador: Lukas Canan | Ambassador Class: 2010 | Grade: 10
Lukas writes about his experience living in the only Buddhist Kingdom in the world, Bhutan. He reflects on the intersection of traditional culture and modern globalization and the challenges that arise in a country that seeks both. Lukas introduces us to an alternative measure of progress found only in this tiny Asian nation, Gross National Happiness.
 
Student Ambassador: Lara Mitra | Ambassador Class: 2010 | Grade: 11
Lara writes about organ dononation after learning about the underground organ trade in India. The issue became all too real when Lara visited her relatives in India and learned of the "Kidney Village." She exposes the dangerous effects of the organ trade on poor people globally and urges our nation's youth to become organ donors.
 
Student Ambassador: Alexandra Fognani | Ambassador Class: 2010 | Grade: 7
Alexandra writes about the issue of bullying in schools. She presents and assesses statistics about the prevalence and impact of bullying while reflecting on a personal experience in which she turned from a bully into a staunch defender of her classmate.
 
Student Ambassador: Sahnun Hassan Mohamud | Ambassador Class: 2010 | Grade: 11
Sahnun writes about the challenges and uncertainty facing youth in Somalia. Following the strong example of his mother and other activists, Sahnun recently started his own NGO to build schools for children in a country ravaged by war and poverty.
 
Student Ambassador: David Zhang | Ambassador Class: 2010 | Grade: 9
David, a first generation American, writes about the appreciation he has for his status as a citizen of the United States and the responsibility it brings. David relates how his upbringing and family history has shaped his worldview and encouraged him to make the most of his education.
 
Student Ambassador: Malcolm Berry | Ambassador Class: 2010 | Grade: 11
Malcolm writes about his work as a peer educator devoted to ending the spread of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. By thoughtfully presenting compelling statistics and personal experience, Malcolm focuses attention on an issue of both local and global significance.
 

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