Become a District Partner Become a District Partner

An Immigrant's Pride

This unit guides students in creating their own editorial. Students learn how to create an outstanding editorial on an important issue of their choice, and then they go through a peer editing process to perfect their work.


Previewing the Reflection:

A series of open-ended pre-reading questions designed to engage students, assess prior knowledge, and expose any pre-conceived ideas about the person or culture explored in the Reflection.  Previewing the Experience questions are intended to be non-threatening and accessible to a range of students.  Students are encouraged to answer honestly, and to discuss their answers with their classmates.This resource addresses DC Standard ELA10.IT-E.5: Make relevant inferences by synthesizing concepts and ideas from a single reading selection.

PDF icon Previewing the Reflection

Reflection: An Immigrant's Pride by David Zhang

David, a first generation American, writes about the appreciation he has for his status as a citizen of the United States and the responsibility it brings. David relates how his upbringing and family history has shaped his worldview and encouraged him to make the most of his education.


Understanding the Reflection:

This resource is to be used during and after students read the Reflection. Included in it are a series of reading comprehension questions designed to check for student understanding of the Reflection. These questions are pulled from the information, ideas, themes, and meaning expressed by the Ambassador in his or her Reflection. “Understanding the Experience” questions vary and can be written using multiple-choice, fill-in-the-blank, true/false, short response, or other effective questioning strategies. Teachers are provided with answer keys. This resource addresses DC Standard ELA10.IT-E.5: Make relevant inferences by synthesizing concepts and ideas from a single reading selection.

PDF icon Understanding the Reflection, PDF icon Understanding the Reflection - ANSWER KEY

Learning Activity: Social Studies-The Editorial

Social Studies / 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th / 2-3 class periods (100 - 150 min)

In this Learning Activity, students write an editorial about a local, national, or global issue that is important to them. Before writing, students explore different newspapers to identify the characteristics that make an editorial effective. After writing, students engage in a guided peer review and then revise their own writing based on the constructive criticism they receive from their peers.

Reviewing the Reflection:

This resource is to be used after students read the Reflection. Included in it are a series of post-reading questions designed to encourage student Reflection and assess changes in students’ perception and understanding of the cultural issues addressed in the unit. For this reason, “Reviewing the Experience” questions deliberately repeat many of the questions asked in the “Previewing the Experience” activity. This resource addresses DC Standard ELA10.IT-E.5: Make relevant inferences by synthesizing concepts and ideas from a single reading selection.

PDF icon Reviewing the Reflection

Responding to the Reflection:

This resource should be used after the students read the Reflection. Students are presented with a list of questions intended to illicit a more personal response about the Reflection they have just read. After considering those questions, students compose a letter to the author of the Reflection with their thoughts, observations, questions and comments. Teachers should feel free to contact info@oneworldeducation.org if they would like to have their students' finished letters delivered to the One World Ambassador.

PDF icon Reflection Response

Culture Cube:

This resource can be used at any point within a unit. The Culture Cube allows students to think about and organize their research of any culture into eight major traits (social groups, government, history, language, daily life, economy, religion, and art). The Culture Cube can prepare students before reading a Reflection, or before doing unit resources and learning activities. Similarly, teachers can use the Culture Cube to wrap up or assess students’ knowledge after engaging in the other unit resources and learning activities. The Culture Cube can be used in isolation of or integrated with the larger One World Curriculum. Definitions and examples of each trait of culture are given to guide students. The Culture Cube requires students to go beyond the Reflection for their research, so teachers need to make available a number of different resources from which students might gather information, including, but not limited to: textbooks, websites, encyclopedias, reference books, reports and maps.